Socialism: Also Known as Communism Lite

  Communism Socialism
Definition International theory or system of social organization based on the holding of all property in common, with actual ownership ascribed to the community or state. Rejection of free markets and extreme distrust of Capitalism in any form. A theory or system of social organization based on the holding of most property in common, with actual ownership ascribed to the workers.
Philosophy From each according to his ability, to each according to his needs. Free-access to the articles of consumption is made possible by advances in technology that allow for super-abundance. From each according to his ability, to each according to his contribution. Emphasis on profit being distributed among the society or workforce to complement individual wages/salaries.
Ideals
  • All people are the same and therefore classes make no sense.
  • The government should own all means of production and land and also everything else.
  • People should work for the government and the collective output should be redistributed equally.
  • All individuals should have access to basic articles of consumption and public goods to allow for self-actualization.
  • Large-scale industries are collective efforts and thus the returns from these industries must benefit society as a whole.
People That Love(d) It
  • Karl Marx
  • Fredrich Engels
  • Vladimir Lenin
  • Leon Trotsky
  • Bernie Sanders
  • My ex-best friend
  • Whoever started the USSR
  • Robert Owen
  • Pierre Leroux
  • John Stuart Mill
  • Albert Einstein
  • George Bernard Shaw
  • Thorstein Veblen
  • Emma Goldman
Key Elements
  • Centralized government
  • Planned economy
  • Dictatorship of the "proletariat"
  • Common ownership of the tools of production
  • No private property
  • Equality between genders and all people
  • International focus
  • Anti-democratic
  • One party system
  • Economic activity and production especially are adjusted by the State to meet human needs and economic demands
  • "Production for use": useful goods and services are produced specifically for their usefulness.
Economics The means of production are held in common, negating the concept of ownership in capital goods. Production is organized to provide for human needs directly without any use for money. Communism is predicated upon a condition of material abundance. The means of production are owned by public enterprises or cooperatives, and individuals are compensated based on the principle of individual contribution. Production may variously be coordinated through either economic planning or markets.
Politics Usually takes the form of totalitarianism as Marx described in The Communist Manifesto. Cronyism common. Can coexist with different political systems. Most socialists advocate participatory democracy, some (Social Democrats) advocate parliamentary democracy, and Marxist-Leninists advocate "Democratic centralism."
Movements
  • Leninism
  • Trotskyism
  • Marxism-Leninism
  • Maoism
  • Left-Communism
  • Stalinism
  • Democratic socialism
  • Communism
  • Libertarian socialism
  • Social anarchism
  • Syndicalism.
Private Property Abolished. The concept of property is negated and replaced with the concept of commons and ownership with "usership". Two kinds of property: Personal property, such as houses, clothing, etc. owned by the individual. Public property includes factories, and means of production owned by the State but with worker control.
Planning Economic planning coordinates all decisions regarding investment, production and resource allocation. Planning is done in terms of physical units instead of money. Planned-socialism relies principally on planning to determine investment and production decisions. Planning may be centralized or decentralized. Market-socialism relies on markets for allocating capital to different socially-owned enterprises.
Social Structure Abolished–all religions and metaphysics are rejected. Freedom of religion, but usually promotes secularism.
Ownership The means of production are commonly-owned, meaning no entity or individual owns productive property. Importance is ascribed to "usership" over "ownership". The means of production are socially-owned with the surplus value produced accruing to either all of society (in public-ownership models) or to all the employee-members of the enterprise (in cooperative-ownership models).
Choice Either the collective "vote" or the state's rulers make economic and political decisions for everyone else.
  • Religion, jobs and marriage are up to the individual
  • Compulsory education
  • Free, equal access to healthcare and education provided through a socialized system funded by taxation
  • Production decisions driven more by State decision than consumer demand
Change Government in a communist state is the agent of change rather than any market or desire on the part of consumers. Change by government can be swift or slow, depending on change in ideology or even whim. Workers in a socialist state are the nominal agent of change rather than any market or desire on the part of consumers. Change by the State on behalf of workers can be swift or slow, depending on change in ideology or even whim.
Discrimination In theory, all members of the state are considered equal. The people are considered equal; laws are made when necessary to protect people from discrimination. Immigration is often tightly controlled.
Examples Ideally, there is no leader; the people govern directly. This has never been actually practiced, and has just used a one-party system. Examples of communist states are the erstwhile Soviet Union, Cuba and North Korea. Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR): although the actual categorization of the USSR's economic system is in dispute, it is often considered to be a form of centrally-planned socialism.

Source

Comments are closed.